We Robot 2019 Poster Proposals Due Soon

A reminder that the (extended) deadline for poster proposals is March 21 — pretty soon. See the Call for Posters for details.

We want to hear about your late-breaking and cutting edge projects! All accepted proposals get a free registration, and entry for the $500 prize for best poster.

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It’s Time to Register for We Robot 2019

We Robot, now heading into its 8th year,
is the leading North American conference on robotics law and policy.
The 2019 event will be held at the University of Miami School of Law on April 11-13, 2019.

Register today!

CLICK HERE for program details

This year’s We Robot will also have a day of workshops on April 11th before the main conference. The poster session will be on April 12th during the main conference in order to showcase late-breaking research and developments.


Do you have a late-breaking or cutting-edge project?
We’d love to feature it in our poster session.
SUBMIT NOW
to get free registration and be eligible for the $500 prize for best poster.


April 11 – 13, 2019

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Newman Alumni Center
6200 San Amaro Dr
Coral Gables, FL 33146

Time: 8am – 5pm

#WeRobot

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We Robot Preliminary Program, Update 1

We’ve posted a revised version of the We Robot 2019 Preliminary Program. Check it out!

 Friday, April 12, 2019
8:30-9:00 Check- in & Breakfast
9:00-9:15Welcome & Introductions
9:15-10:15The Reasonable Coder by Petros Terzis (University of Winchester)
Discussant: Bryan Choi
10:15-11:15The Institutional Life of Algorithmic Risk Assessment by Alicia Solow-Niederman (UCLA School of Law), Guy Van den Broeck (UCLA), & YooJung Choi (UCLA)
Discussant: Kristian Lum
11:15-11:30Break
11:30-12:30Reap What You Sow? Precision Agriculture and The Privacy of Farm Data by Karen Levy (Cornell University), Solon Barocas (Cornell University), & Alexandra Mateescu (Data & Society Research Institute)
Discussant: George Kantor
12:30-12:45Lightening Poster Session
12:45-1:45LUNCH
1:45-3:15Panel: AI & Authorship
Moderator: Kate Darling
3:15-3:30Break
3:30-4:30Delivery Robots and the Influence of Warehouse Logic on Public Spaces by Mason Marks (Yale Law School & NYU Law School
Discussant: Kristen Thomasen
4:30-4:45Break
4:45-5:45Toward a Comprehensive View of the Influence of Artificial Intelligence on International Affairs by Jesse Woo (Kyoto University)
Discussant: Heather Roff
5:45-6:00Closing Remarks
6:00-7:00Poster Session & Reception
7:30-9:30Conference Dinner @ Mayfair Hotel, Coconut Grove, Miami, Florida
 Saturday, April 13, 2019
8:00-8:30 Check- in & Breakfast
8:30-9:30Emerging Legal and Policy Trends in Recent Robot Science Fiction by Robin R Murphy (Texas A&M University)
Discussant: Kevin Bankston
9:30-10:30Taking Futures Seriously: Forecasting as Method in Robotics Law and Policy by Stephanie Ballard (University of Washington) & Ryan Calo (University of Washington)
Discussant: Jennifer Rhee
10:30-11:00Break
11:00-12:00Administering Artificial Intelligence by Alicia Solow-Niederman (UCLA School of Law
Discussant: Michael Froomkin
12:00-1:00Lunch
1:00-2:00Using The Robot Koseki – Using Japanese Family Law as a Model for Regulating Robots by Colin P. Jones (Doshisha Law School)
Discussant: Hideyuki Matsumi
2:00-2:30Break
2:30-3:30Why the Moral Machine is a Monster by Abby Everett Jaques (MIT)
Discussant: Jason Millar
3:30-4:00Break
4:00-5:30Panel: Robot/Human Handoffs
Moderator: Madeleine Elish
5:30-5:45Final Remarks
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We Robot 2019 Call for Posters

We invite poster submissions for the 8th annual robotics law and policy conference—We Robot 2019—to be held at the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Florida, USA, on April 11-13, 2019. Previously, the conference has been held at University of Miami, University of Washington, Stanford, and Yale. The conference web site is at http://robots.law.miami.edu/2019.

We Robot 2019 seeks contributions by American and international academics, practitioners, and others, in the form of scholarly papers, technological demonstrations, or posters. We Robot fosters conversations between the people designing, building, and deploying robots and the people who design or influence the legal and social structures in which robots will operate. We particularly encourage papers that reflect interdisciplinary collaborations between developers of robotics, AI, and related technology and experts in the humanities, social science, and law and policy.

This conference will build on a growing body of scholarship exploring how the increasing sophistication and autonomous decision-making capabilities of robots and their widespread deployment everywhere from the home, to hospitals, to public spaces, to the battlefield disrupts existing legal regimes or requires rethinking policy issues.

How to Submit a Poster Proposal

We Robot’s poster session is designed to accommodate late-breaking and cutting edge projects. This session is ideal for researchers to get feedback on a work in progress. At least one of the authors of each accepted poster should plan to be present at the poster during the entire poster session on the afternoon of April 12, 2019 and for a “lightning round” of one-minute presentations during the main session. If your poster is accepted, we will waive all conference fees. You can bring the poster or, in some cases, with sufficient lead time we may be able to print it in Miami for you. If accepted, you will also need to provide a web-friendly summary of the work that we can post on the conference web site.

How to propose a poster session. Please send an up to 500 word description of what you have or are doing, with links to any relevant photos or audio visual information, as well as your C.V. via the conference submission portal. Please be sure to choose the “Posters ” track for your upload. Submissions open January 15, 2019 and are due by March 21, 2019, and we will send acceptances on a rolling basis.

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We Robot 2019 Preliminary Workshop Schedule

We Robot starts with a day of optional Workshops on April 11. Because We Robot is so interdisciplinary, we’ve found it helpful to offer attendees introductions to basic concepts in a variety of fields so that we can all have a common vocabulary.   The workshop day is optional: you can register for it when reserve your place at We Robot 2019 (April 12-13).

Preliminary Schedule (subject to change):

9:00-10:00 This is not Magic: Basic Technical Concepts for the Latest Developments in Robotics & AI Bill Smart
Cindy Grimm
10:00-11:00 Alexa, What’s a Tort? It Sounds Delicious: Basic Legal Concepts for the Latest Developments in Robotics & AI Ryan Calo
(Woodrow Hartzog moderating)
11:00-11:30 Break
11:30-12:30 Anything You Can Do I Can Do Better: Basic Economic Concepts for the Latest Developments in Robotics & AI Rob Seamans (NYU Stern)
12:30-1:30 Lunch
1:30-2:30 Don’t Look at Me Like That: The Latest Developments in Social Science/Philosophy for Robotics & AI Madeleine Elish
Ari Waldman
2:30-3:30 We’re Not Gonna Take I.T.: Advocacy in Robotics and AI Jay Stanley (ACLU)
Kathrine Pratt
3:30-4:00 Break
4:00-5:00 Get Ready for the Robot Olympics: Japan’s “Robotics 2020” Policy Initiative Fumio Shimpo, Hideyuki Matsumi, Takayuki Kato (Woody Hartzog moderating)
5:00-6:30 Robots and Academics: The Nerdiest Trivia of All Time (plus light appetizers) Rebecca Crootof
Howard Chizeck
Woody Hartzog

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Preliminary Program for We Robot 2019

Thank you to everyone who submitted papers for We Robot 2019! The Program Committee a very large number of interesting paper proposals, which lead to an acceptance rate of under 20%.

Below we list the accepted papers. A fuller program, including dates and times for panels and presentations, discussants, and including demos and information about the poster session will follow:

  • Taking Futures Seriously: Forecasting as Method in Robotics Law and Policy by Stephanie Ballard (University of Washington) & Ryan Calo (University of Washington)
  • Using The Robot Koseki – Using Japanese Family Law as a Model for Regulating Robots by Colin P. Jones (Doshisha Law School)
  • Reap What You Sow? Precision Agriculture and The Privacy of Farm Data by Karen Levy (Cornell University), Solon Barocas (Cornell University), & Alexandra Mateescu (Data & Society Research Institute)
  • Delivery Robots and the Influence of Warehouse Logic on Public Spaces by Mason Marks (Yale Law School & NYU Law School)
  • Why the Moral Machine is a monster by Abby Everett Jaques (MIT)
  • Emerging Legal and Policy Trends in Recent Robot Science Fiction by Robin R Murphy (Texas A&M University)
  • The Institutional Life of Algorithms: Lessons from California’s Money Bail Reform Act by Alicia Solow-Niederman (UCLA School of Law), Guy Van den Broeck (UCLA), & YooJung Choi (UCLA)
  • Administering Artificial Intelligence by Alicia Solow-Niederman (UCLA School of Law)
  • The Reasonable Coder by Petros Terzis (University of Winchester)
  • Toward a Comprehensive View of the Influence of Artifical Intelligence on International Affairs by Jesse Woo (Kyoto University)
  • Panel: Robot/Human Handoffs
    • The Human/Weapon Relationship in the Age of Autonomous Weapons and the Attribution of Criminal Responsibility for War Crimes by Marta Bo (Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies)
    • Through the Handoff Lens: Are Autonomous Vehicles No-Win for Driver-Passengers by Jake Goldenfein (Cornell Tech); Wendy Ju (Cornell Tech); Deirdre Mulligan (UC Berkeley School of Information); Helen Nissenbaum (Cornell Tech)
    • AI, professionals, and professional work: The practice of law with automated decision support technologies by Deirdre Mulligan (UC Berkeley School of Information) & Daniel N Kluttz (UC Berkeley School of Information)
  • Panel: AI & Authorship
    • Artificial Intelligence Patent Infringement by Tabrez Y Ebrahim (California Western School of Law)
    • That Thou Art Mindful: Emergent creativity and the unromantic author by Ian Kerr (University of Ottawa); Carys Craig (York University)
    • Jack of All Trades, Master of None: Is Copyright Protection Justified for Robotic Faux-riginality? by Sarit Mizrahi (University of Ottawa)
    • We Are Not the Same: Consequences of AI Identity Disclosure on User Expectations and Behavior by Anastasia Usova (NYU Stern); Hallie Cho (INSEAD)

Again, thank you to everyone who submitted paper proposals. We are looking forward to April and could not be more excited about these papers.

Please note: Early Bird Registration closes January 11 — save money by registering now.

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Don’t Panic

We figure to get the acceptance and, alas, rejection letters out one or two days behind the original schedule.

So look for them no later than Wednesday.  Apologies for the delay.

 

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By Popular Demand – 48 Hour Extension on We Robot 2019 Submission Deadline

A number of people have asked that we extend our deadline to after the US Election, which will be held on Nov. 6. Given the tight schedule we’ve set for the Program Committee to winnow proposals, there is not much give in our schedule, but we will extend the deadline by 48 hours, to midnight on Wed Nov 7, 2018.

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We Robot Paper/Demo Proposals Due in ONE WEEK

Just ONE WEEK until the midnight Nov 5 deadline for We Robot submissions for scholarly papers and demos!  The Call for Papers, with Guidelines to the submission format and process can be accessed here. (The deadline for poster proposals is March 8, 2019, but acceptances may be offered on a rolling basis.)

The We Robot Program Committee looks forward to considering your proposals and reading about developing social and legal issues in the realm of robotics. Please remember that this is a blind review process, and as such we ask that you refrain from discussing your proposal topic with any of the Committee members.

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More on Submitting Proposals to We Robot

Just about one month to go to the deadline!  Then all the proposals will be considered by the We Robot 2019 Program Committee.  It’s a blind reviewing process, so to maximize your chances of acceptance, please DO NOT discuss the substance of your proposal with any of the people on this list.

General inquiries are welcome to robots@law.miami.edu, but please don’t include specifics about your proposal as it may be seen by a Program Committee member.

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