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We Robot Videos Available

Full videos of We Robot 2012 are now available in the 2012 Video Archive. We intend to have podcast-ready audio-only versions soon.

Podcast-ready MP3s are also available in the same archive.

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We Robot 2012 to Offer Live Streaming Video

We will be offering two free live video streams on Saturday and Sunday.

Feed One will be the We Robot 2012 standard conference video streaming feed for web browsers.

Feed Two will be the We Robot 2012 conference video streaming feed optimized for mobile devices such as iPod, iPad, iPhones and the like.

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Vice Dean Patrick O. Gudridge

Patrick O. Gudridge

Patrick O. Gudridge is Vice Dean and Professor of Law at the University of Miami School of Law.  Professor Gudridge received an A.B. from Harvard College and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.  He served as a law clerk to Justice Mathew O. Tobriner of the California Supreme Court.  In 1977, he joined the University of Miami School of Law faculty and served as Associate Dean at the Law School from 1990 to 1994.  His teaching interests are diverse, including courses in federal jurisdiction, U.S. and Florida constitutional law, jurisprudence, business associations, torts, and agency.

Vice Dean Gudridge will deliver the Welcome Address on Saturday, April 21 at the 8:30am at We Robot 2012 at the University of Miami School of Law in Coral Gables, Florida.

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Discussants and Moderators (Day 1)

We’ve selected a slightly unusual way to organize the presentation of scholarly papers at the We Robot 2012 conference. For the single-paper presentations, rather than have paper authors present their own papers, we’ve chosen a group of distinguished discussants and asked them to do the presentation, and then to also offer an appreciation and critique of it.  The author(s) will then reply to the discussant’s presentation before opening the floor to comments and questions. Moderators of panel discussions will organize the conversations on the panels they are leading.

Annemarie Bridy

Annemarie Bridy will be the Discussant for Neil Richards & William Smart’s paper How Should the Law Think About Robots? on Saturday, April 21 at the 8:45am at We Robot 2012 at the University of Miami School of Law in Coral Gables, Florida.  Professor Bridy is an Associate Professor at the University of Idaho College of Law.  Professor Bridy received her J.D. from the Temple University James E. Beasley School of Law, where she was a member of the Temple Law Review.  She also holds M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in English Literature from the University of California, Irvine.  She served as a judicial clerk for the Honorable William H. Yohn, Jr. of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania and the Honorable Dolores K. Sloviter of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit.  Her work focuses on Internet and intellectual property law, with specific attention to the impact of disruptive technologies on existing frameworks for the protection of intellectual property and the enforcement of intellectual property rights.

Mary Anne Franks

Mary Anne Franks will be the Discussant for Lisa Shay, Gregory Conti, Woodrow Hartzog, John Nelson, and Dominic Larkin’s paper Confronting Automated Law Enforcement on Saturday, April 21 at the 11:45am at We Robot 2012 at the University of Miami School of Law in Coral Gables, Florida.  Professor Franks is an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Miami School of Law.  Professor Franks received her J.D. from Harvard Law School, where she also taught courses in social theory and philosophy.  She holds a doctorate and Masters in Modern Languages and Literature from Oxford University in England, which she attended on a Rhodes Scholarship.  Prior to coming to Miami, Professor Franks was a Bigelow Fellow and Lecturer in Law at the University of Chicago Law School.

Samir Chopra will be the Discussant for F. Patrick Hubbard’s paper Regulation of Liability For Risks of Physical Injury From “Sophisticated Robots” on Saturday, April 21 at the 2:00pm at We Robot 2012 at the University of Miami School of Law in Coral Gables, Florida.  Professor Chopra is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at the Graduate Center and Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn.  He has a Masters in Computer Science from the New Jersey Institute of Technology in Newark, New Jersey and a Ph.D. in Philosophy from the City University of New York, Graduate School and University Center in New York.  Professor Chopra recently authored “A Legal Theory for Autonomous Artificial Agents”, University of Michigan Press, 2011.

Ryan Calo

Ryan Calo will moderate the panel presentation “Social Issues in Robotics” on Saturday, April 21 at the 3:30pm at We Robot 2012 at the University of Miami School of Law in Coral Gables, Florida.  Mr. Calo is Director of Privacy and Robotics for The Center for Internet and Society, a public interest technology law and policy program at Stanford Law School.  Mr. Calo received his J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School in Ann Arbor, Michigan.  He served as a law clerk to the Honorable R. Guy Cole Jr. of the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit.  Mr. Calo will join the law faculty at the University of Washington this summer.

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Links to All the Papers for We Robot 2012

Here’s a handy hyperlinked list of all the downloadable papers for this weekend’s We Robot 2012 conference.

Day One

Day Two

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Sinziana Gutiu on “Sex Robots and Roboticization of Consent”

Sinziana Gutiu

Technology profoundly affects the way humans interact with each other, especially in the most intimate spheres of life.   It is therefore important for humans to consider the effect female-sexbots will have on male-female interactions.   Sinziana Gutiu’s paper states that male interactions with female-sexbots will dehumanize sex and intimacy in male-female relationships.  Her paper argues that three levels of harm arise as a result of human-sexbot interaction.  First, sexbots will socially alienate users by impeding their ability to form human relationships.  Second, they will dehumanize women by promoting rape fantasies.  Lastly, male exposure to female sexbots will erode the need for consent in male-female sexual interactions.  Ms. Gutiu will also discuss the potential legal implications of sex robots and potential regulation.

Sinziana Gutiu will present Sex Robots and Roboticization of Consent on Saturday, April 21st at the 3:30pm “Social Issues in Robotics” Panel Presentation at We Robot 2012 at the University of Miami School of Law in Coral Gables, Florida.  Sinziana Gutiu is a J.D. candidate at the University of Ottawa.  She holds a B.A. in Criminology from Simon Fraser University in British Columbia.  Sinziana is interested in the legal consequences of emerging technologies, with a particular focus on human rights, privacy and human computer interaction.  Following the completion of her degree, Ms. Gutiu will work at Fraser Milner Casgrain LLP in Vancouver, British Columbia.

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Kristen Thomasen on “Liar Liar Pants on Fire! Examining the Constitutionality of Enhanced Robo-Interrogation”

Kristen Thomasen

The combination of human-computer interaction (“HCI”) technology with sensors that monitor human physiological responses offers state agencies improved methods for extracting truthful information from suspects during interrogations.  These technologies have recently been deployed in the form of automated kiosks, where an individual interacts with an avatar interrogator.  The HCI system uses a combination of visual, auditory, near-infrared and other sensors to monitor a suspect’s eye movements, voice, and various other qualities.  The information is then aggregated and analyzed to determine deception.  Kristen Thomasen argues that this type of application poses serious risks to individual rights—such as privacy, the right to silence, and the right to silence.  Her paper explores possible solutions and suggests that courts, HCI technology developers, and state agencies institute limits on how this emerging technology obtains and uses information.

Kristen Thomasen will present Liar Liar Pants on Fire! Examining the Constitutionality of Enhanced Robo-Interrogation on Saturday, April 21st at the 3:30pm “Social Issues in Robotics” Panel Presentation at We Robot 2012 at the University of Miami School of Law in Coral Gables, Florida.  Kristen Thomasen is currently a J.D. 2012 candidate at the University of Ottawa, Ontario.  She has a M.A. in International Affairs from Carleton University in Ottawa and a B.A. in Anthropology from McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario.  Miss Thomasen co-founded the Women’s Legal Mentorship Program.  In 2010, she co-presented with University of Ottawa Professor Ian Kerr, whom she presently works for as a Research Assistant, on “Facebook and a Reasonable Expectation of Privacy”.

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Suneil M. Thomas on “Liquid Robots”

Suneil M. Thomas

Suneil M. Thomas, Esq, is General Counsel and Vice President of Government Affairs for Liquid Robotics Inc., headquartered in Sunnyvale, California.  Prior to joining Liquid Robots Inc., Mr. Thomas worked as Director of Special Projects for The Nature Conservancy and was an attorney with Pillsbury Winthrop and Ellman Burke.  He received his J.D. from Hastings College of Law in San Francisco, California and is a member of the California State Bar Association.

Mr. Thomas will speak on the legal complexities of marine robotics, including, intellectual property, taxation, and export control on Saturday, April 21 at the 10:15am at We Robot 2012 at the University of Miami School of Law in Coral Gables, Florida.

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Lisa A. Shay, Gregory Conti, Woodrow Hartzog, John Nelson, & Dominic Larkin on “Confronting Automated Law Enforcement”

Lisa Shay

Automated law enforcement will be an expanding option for law enforcement and allow for the meticulous enforcement of laws, while reducing manpower requirements.  The authors examine the ways automated law enforcement can be applied to current and future police and government practice.  They propose an analytic framework for analyzing new technologies as they weigh the effects

Woody Hartzog

of law enforcement automation on police efficiency against personal and societal costs.  Their framework incorporates: (1) the subject being monitored, (2) the law enforcement agencies that conduct surveillance, analysis, and enforcement, and (3) a judicial system that determines guilt and imposes punishment.  Automation in any of these areas triggers the considerations covered in the paper.

Professors Lisa A. Shay and Woodrow Hartzog will present Confronting Automated Law Enforcement on Saturday, April 21st at 11:45am at We Robot 2012 at the University of Miami School of Law in Coral Gables, Florida.  Col. Lisa A. Shay is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the United States Military Academy in West Point, NY.  She has a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a Master’s Degree in Engineering from Cambridge University where she studied as a Marshall Scholar.  Woodrow Hartzog is an Assistant Professor at the Cumberland School of Law at Samford University.  He has a Ph.D. in Mass Communication from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, an LL.M in Intellectual Property from George Washington University Law School, and a J.D. from Samford University.  Col. Gregory Conti is an Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the US Military Academy at West Point.  He has a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the Georgia Institute of Technology and is Senior Member of the Association for Computing Machinery.  Col. John Nelson is an Assistant Professor in the Department of English and Philosophy at the US Military Academy at West Point.  He has a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the University of Washington.  Maj. Dominic Larkin is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the US Military Academy at West Point.  He has a M.S. from the Georgia Institute of Technology and a B.S. from Troy State University, all in Computer Science.

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Patrick Hubbard on “Regulation of Liability for Risks of Physical Injury From ‘Sophisticated Robots’”

Patrick Hubbard

Current trends indicate that “sophisticated robots,” with higher intelligence and autonomy than current robots, will be developed for use in public areas like parks and highways as well as in homes, offices, and care facilities.  Professor Hubbard summarizes the current legal system for addressing physical injuries from robots and addresses possible impacts on this system as a result of sophisticated robots.  His paper predicts how sophisticated robots will affect existing contract and tort regimes and how these regimes will be used for imposing liability and determining regulation.  In addition, Professor Hubbard addresses proposals for fostering innovation in sophisticated robots and providing a fair, efficient allocation of liability for injuries caused by these robots, such as the following: (1) development of uniform, national standards for design and use, (2) adoption of regulatory schemes, (3) use of preemption with national regulatory systems, and (4) subsidies to developers of sophisticated robots.

Patrick Hubbard will present Regulation of Liability For Risks of Physical Injury From “Sophisticated Robots” on Saturday, April 21 at 2:00pm at We Robot 2012 at the University of Miami School of Law in Coral Gables, Florida.  Hubbard is a Professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law.  He has a J.D. from New York University Law School, an LL.M. from Yale Law School, and has practiced law in Texas, New York, and South Carolina.  He is the author of “The South Carolina Law of Torts” (4th ed. 2011) and recently published an article on personhood and Artificial Intelligence in Temple Law Review.

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