We Robot Authors: Day One – April 1st

We Robot 2016 is rooted in contributions by academics, practitioners, and others in the form of scholarly papers or demonstrations of technology or other projects. These presentations explore the increasing sophistication and decision-making capabilities of robots, which disrupts existing legal regimes or requires rethinking of various policy issues. 

Madeleine Elish

Madeleine Elish

Madeleine Elish will join We Robot 2016 to present her paper Moral Crumple Zones: Cautionary Tales in Human Robot Interaction on Friday, April 1st at 8:45 AM at the University of Miami Newman Alumni Center in Coral Gables, Florida. Madeleine Claire Elish is an anthropologist focusing on the evolving role of humans in large scale automated and autonomous systems. Her graduate study has focused on forms of physical work that are now being performed virtually, from controlling drones half-way around the world to telemedicine robotics. She currently a PhD candidate in Anthropology at Columbia University and previously earned an S.M. in Comparative Media Studies at MIT. Much of her work involves the intersection of the physical and digital worlds and the ways in which cultures change when the lines shift between the real and the virtual. Madeleine Elish is also a research analyst at Data & Society Research Institute, a New York-based think/do tank focused on social, cultural, and ethical issues arising from data-centric technological development. Madeleine Elish has also worked as a freelance researcher, conducting qualitative research for firms interested in developing new strategies based on social science and ethnographic insights.

Matthew Rueben

Matthew Rueben

Matthew Reuben and Bill Smart will join We Robot 2016 to present their paper Privacy in Human-Robot Interaction: Survey and Future Work on Friday, April 1st at 10:15 AM at the University of Miami Newman Alumni Center in Coral Gables, Florida. Matt is a PhD student in the Personal Robotics group at Oregon State University. He graduated from Oregon State University in 2013 with the H.B.S. Degree in Mechanical Engineering. His current research centers around securing personal privacy protection for people using mobile robots. More information about Matthew Rueben may be found at his Oregon State University page.

 

William D. Smart

Bill Smart

Bill Smart is an Associate Professor at Oregon State University, where he co-directs the Robotics program.  He holds a Ph.D. and Sc.M. in Computer Science from Brown University, an M.Sc. in Intelligent Robotics from the University of Edinburgh, and a B.Sc. (hons) in Computer Science from the University of Dundee.  Prior to moving to Oregon State in 2012, he was an Associate Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, with a courtesy appointment in Biomedical Engineering, at Washington University in St. Louis.  His research interests cover the fields of human-robot interaction, machine learning, and mobile robotics.  His recent work has focused on how robots and robotic technologies can be used for people with severe motor disabilities.  He is particularly proud of his Erdős (3), and his Bacon number (also 3).

Jason Millar

Jason Millar

Jason Millar and AJung Moon will join We Robot 2016 to present their paper How to Engage the Public on the Ethics and Governance of Lethal Autonomous Weapons on Friday, April 1st at 11:45 AM at the University of Miami Newman Alumni Center in Coral Gables, Florida. Dr. Jason Millar (BScE, BA, MA, PhD) researches the design ethics and governance of robotics and automation technologies. In addition to teaching philosophy at Carleton University (Ottawa), he is the Chief Ethics Analyst at the Open Roboethics Initiative (ORi) and is a member of the Organizing Committee of the Foundation for Responsible Robotics. He has a degree in engineering physics, and worked for several years designing telecommunications and aerospace electronics before turning his full-time attention to issues in applied ethics, philosophy and technology. Jason has authored book chapters, reports, and articles on robot ethics, design ethics, privacy, and science and technology policy. His work on design ethics and autonomous cars has been featured internationally in the media. He is co-author of chapters in the forthcoming books: Robot Law, edited by Ryan Calo, Ian Kerr, and Michael Froomkin; and The Oxford Handbook on the Law and Regulation of Technology, edited by Roger Brownsword, Eloise Scotford and Karen Yeung.

AJung Moon

AJung Moon

AJung Moon is a PhD candidate and a Vanier Scholar at the University of British Columbia. She studies human-robot interaction and roboethics / robot ethics under the supervision of Drs. Elizabeth Croft and Mike Van der Loos. Currently she is a visiting student at the Learning Algorithms and Systems Laboratory (LASA) at EPFL. Her research interest is focused on studying the intersection of human-robot interaction (HRI) and roboethics. She specializes in designing nonverbal communication cues (hand gestures, gaze cues) for robots for human-robot collaboration contexts. Currently, she is developing ways for humans and robots to ‘negotiate’ a way out of conflicts using nonverbal gestures. She is a co-founder of the Open Roboethics initiative, an international roboethics think tank that investigates ways in which stakeholders of robotics technologies can work together to influence how robots should shape our future. Outside her office, AJung blogs on her Roboethics Info Database blog, serves as one of the ethics bloggers and a panel of experts for the Robohub.org, tweets @RoboEthics, and manages the facebook group on roboethics.

Harry Surden

Harry Surden

Harry Surden will join We Robot 2016 to present  his paper (co-authored with Mary-Anne Williams), Autonomous Vehicles, Predictability on Friday, April 1st at 3:00 PM at the University of Miami Newman Alumni Center in Coral Gables, Florida. Harry Surden is an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Colorado Law School. He joined the faculty in 2008. His scholarship centers upon intellectual property law with a substantive focus on patents and copyright, information privacy law, legal informatics and legal automation, and the application of computer technology within the legal system. Prior to joining CU, Professor Surden was a resident fellow at the Stanford Center for Legal Informatics (CodeX) at Stanford Law School. In that capacity, Professor Surden conducted interdisciplinary research with collaborators from the Stanford School of Engineering exploring the application of computer technology towards improving the legal system. He was also a member of the Stanford Intellectual Property Litigation Clearinghouse and the director of the Computer Science and Law Initiative. Professor Surden was law clerk to the Honorable Martin J. Jenkins of the United States District Court for the Northern District of California in San Francisco. He received his law degree from Stanford Law School with honors and was the recipient of the Stanford Law Intellectual Property Writing Award. Prior to law school, Professor Surden worked as a software engineer for Cisco Systems and Bloomberg L.P. He received his undergraduate degree with honors from Cornell University. Professor Surden is an Affiliated Faculty Member at The Stanford Center for Legal Informatics (CodeX).

Mary-Anne Williams

Mary-Anne Williams

Mary-Anne Williams is the co-author  of Autonomous Vehicles, Predictability.  She is the Director of the Innovation and Enterprise Research Laboratory (The Magic Lab) at UTS. Mary-Anne has a Masters of Laws and a PhD in Knowledge Representation and Reasoning with transdisciplinary strengths in AI, disruptive innovation, design thinking, data analytics, IP law and privacy law. Mary-Anne is a Faculty Fellow at Stanford University and a Guest Professor at the University of Science and Technology China where she gives intensive courses on disruptive innovation. Mary-Anne chaired the Australian Research Council’s Excellence in Research for Australia Committee that undertook a national evaluation of Mathematics, Information and Computing Sciences in 2012. Mary-Anne has a passion for design led innovation.  She works with her research team in the Magic Lab to bring science fiction to reality; the research goal is to design autonomous technologies that can learn to delight and adapt in novel situations as they collaborate with people to achieve shared goals.

Françoise Gilbert

Françoise Gilbert

Françoise Gilbert and Raffaele Zallone will join We Robot 2016 to present their paper Connect Cars – Recent Legal Developments on Friday, April 1st at 3:00 PM at the University of Miami Newman Alumni Center in Coral Gables, Florida. Françoise Gilbert is a partner at Greenberg Traurig, and practices in the firm’s Silicon Valley office, located in East Palo Alto, California, where she advises public companies, emerging technology businesses and non-profit organizations, on the entire spectrum of domestic and international privacy and cyber security issues legal issues. Francoise has focused on information privacy and security for more than 25 years; she regularly deals with compliance challenges raised by cloud computing, connected objects, smart cities, big data, mobile applications, wearable devices, social media, and other cutting-edge developments. In 2015, she was named as a “Cybersecurity and Privacy Trailblazer”by  the National Law Journal.  In 2014, she was named “San Francisco Lawyer of the Year” by Best Lawyers for her work in information privacy and security.  She has been listed in Chambers USA and Chambers Global since 2008, Best Lawyers in America since 2007, and Who’s Who in Ecommerce and Internet Law since 1998 as one of the leady privacy and cybersecurity attorneys.  She is accredited as a Certified Information Privacy Manager (CIPM) and a Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/US, CIPP/E) by the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP).

Raffaele Zallone

Raffaele Zallone

Raffaele Zallone is the founding partner of Studio Legale Zallone, a niche Italian law firm highly specialized in Hi-Tech Law, Data Privacy, IT contracts, e-Commerce, Internet Law and Regulation, and Biotech issues. Prior to founding Studio Legale Zallone, Raffaele was General Counsel for IBM in Italy. During his career at IBM he held several managerial and executive positions both in Italy and across the world. As a junior attorney he worked in the IBM GPD development lab in San Jose, California; later in his career he worked in IBM Europe as General Counsel for the Nordic region (all Scandinavian countries and Ireland). From 2002 to 2008 Mr. Zallone taught IT Law at the University Luigi Bocconi of Milano, one of the most prestigious institutions in Italy.

Ryan Calo

Ryan Calo

Ryan Calo will join We Robot 2016 to present his paper Robots In American Law on Friday, April 1st at 4:30 PM at the University of Miami Newman Alumni Center in Coral Gables, Florida. Ryan Calo is an assistant professor at the University of Washington School of Law and an assistant professor (by courtesy) at the Information School. He is a faculty co-director (with Batya Friedman and Tadayoshi Kohno) of the University of Washington Tech Policy Lab, a unique, interdisciplinary research unit that spans the School of Law, Information School, and Department of Computer Science and Engineering. Professor Calo is a CoMotion Presidential Innovation Fellow for the class of 2015. Professor Calo’s research on law and emerging technology appears or is forthcoming in leading law reviews (California Law Review, University of Chicago Law Review, Stanford Law Review Online, University of Pennsylvania Law Review Online) and technical publications (MIT Press, IEEE, Science, Artificial Intelligence), and is frequently referenced by the mainstream media (NPR, New York Times, Wall Street Journal). Professor Calo has also testified before the full Judiciary Committee of the United States Senate and spoken at the Aspen Ideas Festival and NPR’s Weekend in Washington. In 2014, he was named one of the most important people in robotics by Business Insider. Professor Calo is an affiliate scholar at the Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society (CIS), where he was a research fellow, and the Yale Law School Information Society Project (ISP). He serves on numerous advisory boards, including the University of California’s People and Robots Initiative, the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC), Without My Consent, and the Future of Privacy Forum. Professor Calo worked as an associate in the Washington, D.C. office of Covington & Burling LLP and clerked for the Honorable R. Guy Cole on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. Prior to law school at the University of Michigan, Professor Calo investigated allegations of police misconduct in New York City.

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