Kris Hauser, Andrew A. Proia, and Drew T. Simshaw on “Consumer Cloud Robotics and the Fair Information Practice Principles: The Policy Risks and Opportunities Ahead”

Consumer Cloud Robotics and the Fair Information Practice Principles: The Policy Risks and Opportunities Ahead
Kris Hauser, Andrew A. Proia, Drew T. Simshaw

Kris Hauser

Kris Hauser

Rapid technological innovation has made commercially accessible consumer robotics a reality. At the same time, individuals and organizations are turning to “the cloud” for more convenient and cost effective data storage and management. It seemed only inevitable that these two technologies would merge to create “cloud robotics,” described by Google Research Scientist Dr. James Kuffner as “a new approach to robotics that takes advantage of the Internet as a resource for massively parallel computation and sharing of vast data resources.” By making robots lighter, cheaper, and more efficient, cloud robotics could be the catalyst for a mainstream consumer robotics marketplace. However, this new industry would join a host of modern consumer technologies that seem to have rapidly outpaced the legal and regulatory regimes implemented to protect consumers.  Recently, consumer advocates and the tech industry have focused their attention on information privacy and security, and how to establish sufficient safeguards for the collection, retention, and dissemination of personal information while still allowing technologies to flourish.

Drew T. Simshaw

Drew T. Simshaw

Underlying a majority of these proposals, whether it be through legislation or industry self-regulation, are a set of practices, articulated in the 1970s, that address how personal information should be collected, used, retained, managed, and deleted, known as the Fair Information Practice Principles (“FIPPs”).

Andrew A. Proia

Andrew A. Proia

This paper first will provide a brief history of the FIPPs, focusing primarily on their influence in the consumer space. This section will examine how the original FIPPs came into existence and how they have taken shape in the national and international communities. It will also detail three influential variations of the FIPPs which are likely to influence the information privacy and security regulations of cloud robotics in U.S. consumer products. Second, this paper will introduce many within the information law and policy realm to the vastly advancing (yet little known) technology known as cloud robotics. Then, with the help of privacy fellows and roboticists, the paper dissects how each principle, and its relevant variations, will affect the efficiency and interoperability of cloud robotics in the consumer marketplace.

By providing practical observations of how cloud robotics may emerge in a consumer marketplace regulated by the FIPPs, this research will help both the information privacy and robotics fields in beginning to address the policy risks and opportunities ahead.

Andrew A. Proia and Drew T. Simshaw will discuss “Consumer Cloud Robotics and the Fair Information Practice Principles: The Policy Risks and Opportunities Ahead” as part of the Panel on Robots and Social Justice moderated by Kate Darling on Friday, April 4th at 2:00 PM at the University of Miami Newman Alumni Center in Coral Gables, Florida.

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Jason Millar on Proxy Prudence – Rethinking Models of Responsibility for Semi-autonomous Robots

Proxy Prudence – Rethinking Models of Responsibility for Semi-autonomous Robots
Jason Millar

Jason Millar

Jason Millar

As robots become more autonomous—capable of acting in complex ways, independent of direct human interaction—their actions will challenge traditional notions of responsibility. How, for example, do we sort out responsibility when a self-driving car swerves this way or that in a situation where all possible outcomes lead to harm? This paper explores the question of responsibility from both philosophical and legal perspectives, by examining the relationship between designers, semi-autonomous robots and users. Borrowing concepts from the philosophy of technology, bioethics and law, I argue that in certain use contexts we can reasonably describe a robot as acting as a moral proxy on behalf of a person. In those cases I argue it is important to instantiate the proxy relationship in a morally justifiable way. I examine two questions that are helpful in determining how to appropriately instantiate proxy relationships with semi-autonomous robots, and that we can also ask when attempting to sort out responsibility: 1) On whose behalf was the robot acting?; and 2) On whose behalf ought the robot to have been acting?

Focusing on proxy relationships allows us to shift our focus away from a strictly causal model of responsibility and focus also on a proxy model informed by an ethical analysis of the nature of the designer-artefact-user relationship. By doing so I argue that we gain some traction on problems of responsibility with semi-autonomous robots. I examine two cases to demonstrate how a shift towards a proxy model of responsibility, and away from a strictly causal model of responsibility helps to manage risks and provides a more accurate accounting of responsibility in some use contexts. I offer some suggestions how we might decide whom a robot ought legitimately to be acting on behalf of, while offering some thoughts on what legal and ethical implications my argument carries for designers and users.

Jason Millar will present Proxy Prudence – Rethinking Models of Responsibility for Semi-autonomous Robots on Friday, April 4th at 10:15 AM with discussant Peter Asaro at the University of Miami Newman Alumni Center in Coral Gables, Florida.

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Meg Leta Ambrose on “Regulating the Loop: Ironies of Automation Law”

This is the first in a series of posts we will be running about the upcoming presentations at We Robot 2014. Registration is still open. Subscribe to our RSS feed or follow on us on Twitter for more updates.

Regulating the Loop: Ironies of Automation Law
Meg Leta Ambrose

Rapid developments in sensors, computing, and robotics, as well as power, kinetics, control, telecommunication, and artificial intelligence have presented opportunities to further integrate sophisticated automation across society. With these opportunities come questions about the ability of current laws and policies to protect important social values new technologies may threaten. As sophisticated automation moves beyond the cages of factories and cock pits, the need for a legal approach suitable to guide an increasingly automated future becomes more pressing.

Meg Leta Ambrose

Meg Leta Ambrose

This paper analyzes examples of legal approaches to automation thus far by legislative, administrative, judicial, state, and international bodies. The case studies reveal an interesting irony: while automation regulation is intended to protect and promote human values, by focusing on the capabilities of the automation, this approach results in less protection of human values. The irony is similar to those pointed out by Lisanne Bainbridge in 1983, when she described how designing automation to improve the life of the operator using an automation-centered approach actually made the operator’s life worse and more difficult.

The ironies that result from automation-centered legal approaches are a product of the neglect of the sociotechnical nature of automation: the relationships between man and machine is situated and interdependent; humans will always be in the loop; and reactive policies ignore the need for general guidance for ethical and accountable automation design and implementation. Like system engineers three decades ago, policymakers must adjust the focus of legal treatment of automation to recognize the interdependence of man and machine to avoid the ironies of automation law and meet the goals of ethical integration. The article proposes that the existing models for automated system design and principles currently utilized for safe and actual implementation be added to for ethical and sociotechnical legal approach to automation.

Meg Leta Ambrose will present “The Law and the Loop” with discussant Elizabeth Grossman on Friday, April 4th at 8:45 AM at the University of Miami Newman Alumni Center in Coral Gables, Florida.

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Who Is Coming to We Robot 2014

We Robot has great speakers, but it also has great attendees. Attendees have access to authors’ papers two weeks in advance, as they are posted on line. During the program we leave plenty of time for audience participation. Additionally, we have Birds of a Feather sessions on Friday night that allow everyone to talk more informally.

We’ve just posted a partial list of who is coming to We Robot (we only posted names where registrants consented). If you would like to join in, now is the time to register for We Robot 2014.

We’ll update the attendee list from time to time between now and the conference.

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Google is a Sensor-Level Sponsor of We Robot 2014

Google-LogoWe’re pleased to announce that Google has joined We Robot as a Sensor-level sponsor.

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We Robot 2014 Program Announced

Registration is now open for We Robot 2014. We have a terrific program planned:

Friday, April 4th

8:00 am

Check-in and Breakfast

8:30 am

Introductions
Welcome and Introduction of Sponsors
A Few Words from Our Sponsors
Introductory Remarks: A. Michael Froomkin, Program Chair

8:45 am

Regulating The Loop
Meg Leta Ambrose, Communication, Culture, and Technology, Georgetown University
Discussant: Elizabeth Grossman, Microsoft Corp.

10:00 am Break

10:15 am

Rethinking Models of Responsibility for Semi-Autonomous Robots
Jason Millar, Philosophy, Carleton University
Discussant: Peter Asaro, School of Media Studies, The New School for Public Engagement, Stanford Law School, International Committee for Robot Arms Control

11:30 am Break

11:45 am

Robots as Labor Creating Devices: Robotic Technologies and the Expansion of the Second Shift
Ann Bartow, Pace Law School
Discussant: Jodi Forlizzi, Human-Computer Interaction Institute, Carnegie Mellon University

1:00 pm Lunch

2:00 pm

Panel on Robots and Social Justice
Moderator: Kate Darling, MIT Media Lab

  • The Canny Valley: Law, Ethics, and the Design of Robots Increasingly Able to Mimic and Invite Affection
    Kenneth Anderson, Washington College of Law, American University, The Hoover Institution, Stanford University, The Brookings Institution
  • Consumer Cloud Robotics and the Fair Information Practice Principles: The Policy Risks and Opportunities Ahead
    Kris Hauser, Computer Science and Informatics, Indiana University
    Andrew A. Proia, Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research, Indiana University
    Drew T. Simshaw, Center for Law, Ethics, and Applied Research in Health Information, Indiana University
  • Professional Ethics for Human-Robot Interaction (HRI) Research, Development, and Marketing
    Laurel D. Riek, Computer Science and Engineering, University of Notre Dame
    Don Howard, Philosophy, University of Notre Dame
  • Robots in School: Disability and the Promise (or Specter?) of Radical Educational Equality
    Aaron Jay Saiger, Fordham University School of Law

3:45 pm Break

4:00 pm

Parallel Demonstrations

  • TeleRobotics
    Howard Jay Chizeck, Electrical Engineering & Bioengineering, University of Washington
  • Automated Algorithmic Software Trading Robots: Sousveillance, and Continuous Cloud Sync Video SEO (Search Engine Optimization) Audit Trails 
    Avi Rushinek, University of Miami School of Business
    Sara Rushinek University of Miami School of Business

5:00 pm

Survey: “So, What do YOU think a robot is?” A short quiz for the audience.
Bill Smart, Mechanical Engineering, Oregon State University

5:30 pm

Reception

7:00 pm

Birds of a Feather Sessions
@ Local restaurants


Saturday, April 5th

8:00 am

Check-in and Breakfast

8:30 am

Chief Justice John Roberts is a Robot
Ian Kerr, Faculty of Law, Faculty of Medicine & Department of Philosophy, University of Ottawa
Carissima Mathen, Faculty of Law, University of Ottawa
Discussant: Jack Balkin, Yale Law School

9:45 am Break

10:00 am

When Robot Eyes Are Watching You: The Law & Policy of Automated Communications Surveillance
Kevin Bankston, New America Foundation
Amie Stepanovich, Electronic Privacy Information Center
Discussant: Neil Richards, Washington University School of Law

11:15 am Break

11:30 am

Robotics and the New Cyberlaw
Ryan Calo, University of Washington School of Law
Discussant: David Post, Beasley School of Law, Temple University

12:45 pm Lunch

1:45 pm

Prison of Our Own Making: An Expanded View of Automated Law Enforcement
Col. Lisa A. Shay, Electrical Engineering & Computer Science, United States Military Academy
Woodrow Hartzog, Cumberland School of Law, Samford University
Col. John C. Nelson, English & Philosophy, United States Military Academy
Col. Gregory Conti, Electrical Engineering & Computer Science & Information Technology Operations Center, United States Military Academy
Discussant: Mary Anne Franks, University of Miami School of Law

3:00 pm Break

3:15 pm

Panel on Domestic Drones

Moderator: Dan Siciliano, Rock Center for Corporate Governance, Stanford Law School

  • Robots, Micro-Airspaces, and the Future of “Public Space”
    Peter Asaro, New School for Public Engagement, Stanford Law School, International Committee for Robot Arms Control
  • Risk, Product Liability Trends, Triggers, and Insurance in Commercial Aerial Robots
    David K. Breyer, Digital Risk Resources
    Donna A. Dulo, U.S. Department of Defense
    Gale A. Townsley, Severson & Werson PC
    Stephen S. Wu, Cooke Kobrick & Wu LLP
  • A Legal Framework for the Safe and Resilient Operation of Autonomous Aerial Robots
    Cameron R. Cloar, Nixon Peabody LLP
    Donna A. Dulo, U.S. Department of Defense
  • Self-Defense Against Robots
    A. Michael Froomkin, University of Miami School of Law
    Zak Colangelo, University of Miami School of Law

4:45 pm

Final Remarks

All events at University of Miami Newman Alumni Center except Birds of a Feather Sessions.

(Please note that this is a preliminary program, and may be subject to change.)

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Yale ISP is a Sensor-Level Sponsor of We Robot 2014

ISP logo(1)We’re pleased to announce that the Yale Law School’s Information Society Project — Yale ISP for short — has joined We Robot 2014 as a Sensor-Level Sponsor.

The Information Society Project at Yale Law School is an intellectual center addressing the implications of the Internet and new information technologies for law and society, guided by the values of democracy, development, and civil liberties.  More information about the center is available at the Yale ISP website.

 

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We Robot 2014 Accepted Papers

We’re excited to announce the list of accepted papers for We Robot 2014. A full program with discussants and panel moderators will be ready soon.

We had a record number of high-quality submissions, and were able to accept fewer than 25% of those submitted; we’re looking forward to an excellent conference.

Regulating The Loop
Meg Leta Ambrose, Georgetown University

The Canny Valley: Law, Ethics, and the Design of Robots Increasingly Able to Mimic and Invite Affection
Kenneth Anderson, Washington College of Law, American University, The Hoover Institution, Stanford University, The Brookings Institution

Robots, Micro-Airspaces, and the Future of “Public Space”
Peter Asaro, New School for Public Engagement, Stanford Law School, International Committee for Robot Arms Control

When Robot Eyes Are Watching You: The Law & Policy of Automated Communications Surveillance
Kevin Bankston, New America Foundation
Amie Stepanovich, Electronic Privacy Information Center

Robots as Labor Creating Devices: Robotic Technologies and the Expansion of the Second Shift
Ann Bartow, Pace Law School

Risk, Product Liability Trends, Triggers, and Insurance in Commercial Aerial Robots
David K. Breyer, Digital Risk Resources
Donna A. Dulo, U.S. Department of Defense
Gale A. Townsley, Severson & Werson PC
Stephen S. Wu, Cooke Kobrick & Wu LLP

Robotics and the New Cyberlaw
Ryan Calo, University of Washington School of Law

Medical Robotics Demo
Howard Jay Chizeck, University of Washington

A Legal Framework for the Safe and Resilient Operation of Autonomous Aerial Robots
Cameron R. Cloar, Nixon Peabody LLP
Donna A. Dulo, U.S. Department of Defense

Self-Defense Against Robots
A. Michael Froomkin, University of Miami School of Law
Zak Colangelo, University of Miami School of Law

Consumer Cloud Robotics and the Fair Information Practice Principles: The Policy Risks and Opportunities Ahead
Kris Hauser, Indiana University
Andrew A. Proia, Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research
Drew T. Simshaw, Center for Law, Ethics, and Applied Research in Health Information

Chief Justice John Roberts is a Robot
Ian Kerr, University of Ottawa
Carissima Mathen, University of Ottawa

Rethinking Models of Responsibility for Semi-Autonomous Robots
Jason Millar, Queen’s University

Professional Ethics for HRI Research, Development, and Marketing
Laurel D. Riek, University of Notre Dame
Don Howard, University of Notre Dame

Demo: Automated Algorithmic Software Trading Robots: Sousveillance, and Continuous Cloud Sync Video SEO (Search Engine Optimization) Audit Trails 
Avi Rushinek, University of Miami School of Business
Sara Rushinek University of Miami School of Business

Robots in School: Disability and the Promise (or Specter?) of Radical Educational Equality
Aaron Jay Saiger, Fordham University School of Law

Prison of Our Own Making: An Expanded View of Automated Law Enforcement
Col. Lisa A. Shay, United States Military Academy
Woodrow Hartzog, Samford University
Col. John C. Nelson, United States Military Academy
Col. Gregory Conti, United States Military Academy

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Microsoft is a Processor-Level Sponsor of We Robot 2014

MSFT_logo_rgb_C-Gray_DWe are pleased to announce Microsoft has agreed to support We Robot 2014 as a Processor level sponsor.

Microsoft was a supporter of We Robot 2013, and we are very grateful to have them on board again. In addition to making products ranging from Windows and Microsoft Office to the Xbox game console and Microsoft Robotics Developer Studio, Microsoft is involved in many facets of robot-related research and development.

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UM Ethics Programs is a Processor Level Sponsor of We Robot 2014

UM_Ethics-webThe University of Miami Ethics Programs have agreed to support We Robot 2014 as a Processor level sponsor. Established in 1991, the University of Miami Ethics Programs foster and support a range of efforts dedicated to education, research and community service in ethics and the professions. This university-wide inter- and multi-disciplinary program has emphasized work in bioethics, business and professional ethics, research and scientific ethics. From undergraduate UM academic societies to the federal government, the Ethics Programs have enjoyed a variety of collaborations on and contributions to special projects.

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